University Research

Posted by kate Poels on Monday, May 20, 2019
I am so excited to have been asked by a study team at the University of Reading to help with their research into the creative teaching of language.  I will be going into Year 5 classrooms with a fantastic graphic designer and illustrator - Tamalia Reeves - to see if it's possible to teach maths vocabulary through story writing and illustration. What a fantastic opportunity to maybe throw some questions up about the way the curriculum is currently being taught in our primary schools.  I have thought for a long time now that the squeezing out of creativity and the strict rules and formats of our young learners' primary timetables are stopping them from tapping into the part of the brain that lets them experiment and try out their own ideas.  There have been many arguments about the amount of testing our wee ones go through and the increasing push for them to be experts in SPAG (spelling, punctuation and grammar.)  Of course this is important but surely not more important than just letting their imaginations go wild and make up wonderful stories without worrying about the sort of clauses they're dropping in or how their sentences are fronted.
If this research goes well and we can prove that creativity and stories can help across the curriculum them who knows, maybe we can start to shift the emphasis away from rigid structure and allow our young minds to go wild!



University Research

Posted by kate Poels on Monday, May 20, 2019
I am so excited to have been asked by a study team at the University of Reading to help with their research into the creative teaching of language.  I will be going into Year 5 classrooms with a fantastic graphic designer and illustrator - Tamalia Reeves - to see if it's possible to teach maths vocabulary through story writing and illustration. What a fantastic opportunity to maybe throw some questions up about the way the curriculum is currently being taught in our primary schools.  I have thought for a long time now that the squeezing out of creativity and the strict rules and formats of our young learners' primary timetables are stopping them from tapping into the part of the brain that lets them experiment and try out their own ideas.  There have been many arguments about the amount of testing our wee ones go through and the increasing push for them to be experts in SPAG (spelling, punctuation and grammar.)  Of course this is important but surely not more important than just letting their imaginations go wild and make up wonderful stories without worrying about the sort of clauses they're dropping in or how their sentences are fronted.
If this research goes well and we can prove that creativity and stories can help across the curriculum them who knows, maybe we can start to shift the emphasis away from rigid structure and allow our young minds to go wild!